Article 29 Working Party adopts guidelines on the implementation on the Right to be Forgotten judgment of the CJEU

By Patrick Van Eecke & Julie De Bruyn

The Article 29 Working Party, the European data protection advisory body existing of representatives of the national data protection authorities of the EU Member States, announced yesterday to have adopted guidelines – for national data protection authorities – on the implementation of the Court of Justice’s ruling on the right to be forgotten.

Continue Reading Europe: Right to be forgotten guidelines adopted by WP29

by Patrick Van Eecke and Julie De Bruyn

Last week proved to be an important week for privacy and data protection in the US: while representatives of the European Commission were negotiating with US representatives on government surveillance and the extension of the US Privacy Act to EU citizens, the
Continue Reading Connected Cars & Privacy: Automotive industry adopts consumer privacy principles

By Patrick Van Eecke and Antoon Dierick

Almost five months after federal parliamentary elections took place, the negotiators from the four political parties around the negotiating table (Flemish parties NVA, CD&V and Open VLD and Walloon party MR) reached a coalition agreement which contains quite a few interesting policy initiatives
Continue Reading BELGIUM: Belgian government’s new focus on privacy and technology laws

By Patrick Van Eecke and Elisabeth Verbrugge

Working Party 29 issued a working document on model clauses for personal data transfers from EU data processors to non-EU sub-processors. This is an important step towards creating a more comprehensive framework for contract-based personal data transfers outside the EEA.

European data
Continue Reading EU – International data transfers from processors to processors made easier, good news for cloud providers and outsourcers

MORE ENFORCEMENT POWERS FOR BELGIAN PRIVACY COMMISSION

By Patrick Van Eecke and Julie De Bruyn (DLA Piper – Brussels)

The quietness in the privacy landscape in Belgium is about to drastically change. Reason for the change of pace are the recent major data breaches that were published by the media. The Privacy Commission announced it will establish a dedicated task force to carry out proactive audits focusing on different sectors, such as financial and insurance institutions, hospitals and other health providers, and telecom operators.

Draft Belgian legislation will grant the Privacy Commission the power to independently impose monetary fines and other sanctions, such as the blocking of access to certain databases by non-compliant companies, or the withdrawal of the permits to make use of such (public) databases. The expansion of powers would transform the Privacy Commission from passive bystander to an actual ‘Privacy Police’.


Continue Reading Belgium: Beware of the barking Privacy Watchdog, she’s biting

By Patrick Van Eecke and Antoon Dierick – DLA Piper Brussels;     

On November 6, a Paris Court ordered Google to filter out hyperlinks to images of former F1 boss Max Mosley in an allegedly Nazi-themed sadomasochistic orgy. (TGI Paris, 17e ch., 6 novembre 2013, RG 11/07970, Max Mosley c. Google Inc et Google France)

This judgement is situated on the crossroads of privacy rights, freedom of information and cooperation duties of internet intermediaries. A soon to be expected European Court of Justice judgement in a similar case may bring more clarity in finding the right balance between these rights and values.

Continue Reading Europe: Mosley v Google – game, set but not match yet.

DLA Piper lawyers had the opportunity to review the European Parliament draft report on the Data Protection Regulation proposal that will be presented by Rapporteur Albrecht to the European Parliament on 10 January 2013. The proposed legislative changes  would impose significant additional requirements on entities that collect data about EU
Continue Reading European Parliament Seeks to Broaden the Scope of the Draft Data Protection Regulation and Strengthen its Application