Article 29 Working Party adopts guidelines on the implementation on the Right to be Forgotten judgment of the CJEU

By Patrick Van Eecke & Julie De Bruyn

The Article 29 Working Party, the European data protection advisory body existing of representatives of the national data protection authorities of the EU Member States, announced yesterday to have adopted guidelines – for national data protection authorities – on the implementation of the Court of Justice’s ruling on the right to be forgotten.


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By Patrick Van Eecke and Antoon Dierick

Almost five months after federal parliamentary elections took place, the negotiators from the four political parties around the negotiating table (Flemish parties NVA, CD&V and Open VLD and Walloon party MR) reached a coalition agreement which contains quite a few interesting policy initiatives
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By Patrick Van Eecke and Julie De Bruyn

Call it a coincidence or not: exactly one week after the Apple Watch was officially introduced by Apple CEO Tim Cook on 9 September 2014, the European data protection advisory body – Article 29 Data Protection Working Party (‘Working Party 29’) – adopted its Opinion 8/2014 on the Recent Development on the Internet of Things.

While the Working Party 29 acknowledges the potential of these ‘smart’ devices monitoring and communicating (in) our daily lives, it stresses that the privacy and security challenges generated by this should not be overlooked. The key to support trust and innovation – and to being successful on the market of the Internet of Things – is to keep the individuals concerned informed, free and safe.


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By Patrick Van Eecke and Elisabeth Verbrugge

Working Party 29 issued a working document on model clauses for personal data transfers from EU data processors to non-EU sub-processors. This is an important step towards creating a more comprehensive framework for contract-based personal data transfers outside the EEA.

European data
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MORE ENFORCEMENT POWERS FOR BELGIAN PRIVACY COMMISSION

By Patrick Van Eecke and Julie De Bruyn (DLA Piper – Brussels)

The quietness in the privacy landscape in Belgium is about to drastically change. Reason for the change of pace are the recent major data breaches that were published by the media. The Privacy Commission announced it will establish a dedicated task force to carry out proactive audits focusing on different sectors, such as financial and insurance institutions, hospitals and other health providers, and telecom operators.

Draft Belgian legislation will grant the Privacy Commission the power to independently impose monetary fines and other sanctions, such as the blocking of access to certain databases by non-compliant companies, or the withdrawal of the permits to make use of such (public) databases. The expansion of powers would transform the Privacy Commission from passive bystander to an actual ‘Privacy Police’.


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